Cornucopia

Mythological Dictionary

The Latin cornucopia means "horn of plenty." There are two stories about this horn, which bestows upon the owner an endless bounty. Zeus, in his secluded infancy on Crete, was nursed by a goat named Amalthea, which was also the name of the goddess of plenty. One of the horns of this goat was broken off and became the first cornucopia. The horn of plenty is also associated with Hercules. In order to win Deianira as his bride, he had to defeat the horned river-god Achelous. In the struggle, Hercules broke off one of the horns of the river-god but after his victory returned the horn and received as recompense the horn of Amalthea. Ovid, however, relates that the horn of Achelous became a second horn of plenty. Today the cornucopia is a sign of nature's abundance, and the word comes to mean a plenteous bounty.

 
Mythological [1] [2] [3] [4]

Post Comment: Your name: Your Email:

Comments :
   
Mythological Dictionary
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Horoscope | Daily | Weekly | Monthly | News | Zodiac | Compatibility | Natal |
Proverbs | Chinese Astrology | Links | Glossary | Contact |