Proverb Source Japanese



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  • Proverb Source: Japanese [1] [2] [3] [4]

    Wise Sayings


    info

    To wait for luck is the same as waiting for death.

    Source: Japanese
    Transactions in Hell also depend upon money.

    Source: Japanese
    Unless you enter the tiger's den you cannot take the cubs.

    Source: Japanese
    Virtue is not knowing but doing.

    Source: Japanese
    Vision with action is a daydream; action without vision is a nightmare.

    Source: Japanese
    Walls have ears, bottles have mouths.

    Source: Japanese
    Walls have ears, paper sliding doors have eyes.

    Source: Japanese
    We are no more than candles burning in the wind.

    Source: Japanese
    We learn little from victory, much from defeat.

    Source: Japanese
    We're fools whether we dance or not, so we might as well dance.

    Source: Japanese
    We've arrived, and to prove it we're here.

    Source: Japanese
    When the time comes, even a rat becomes a tiger.

    Source: Japanese
    When you're thirsty it's too late to think about digging a well.

    Source: Japanese
    When your companions get drunk and fight, Take up your hat, and wish them good night.

    Source: Japanese
    While we consider when to begin, it becomes too late.

    Source: Japanese
    Wisdom and virtue are like the two wheels of a cart.

    Source: Japanese
    Japanese [1] [2] [3] [4]