Proverb Source Latin



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  • Proverb Source: Latin [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37] [38] [39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [48] [49] [50] [51] [52] [53] [54] [55] [56] [57] [58] [59] [60] [61] [62] [63] [64] [65] [66] [67] [68] [69] [70] [71] [72] [73] [74] [75] [76] [77] [78] [79]

    Wise Sayings


    info

    The hedge is trodden down where it seems to lean. [Vis., at its weakest point.]

    Source: Latin
    The highest seat will not hold more than one.

    Source: Latin
    The highest spoke in fortune's wheel may soon turn lowest.

    Source: Latin
    The highest tree hath the greatest fall.

    Source: Latin
    The hindmost dog may catch the hare.

    Source: Latin
    The hour is passing.

    Source: Latin
    The intemperate die young, and rarely en joy old age.

    Source: Latin
    The knowledge of sin is the beginning of salvation.

    Source: Latin
    The laborer is worthy of his hire.

    Source: Latin
    The labour is in itself a pleasure.

    Source: Latin
    The laughter, the tears, and the song of a woman are equally deceptive.

    Source: Latin
    The law of requital of injury by injury.

    Source: Latin
    The madness of one makes many mad.

    Source: Latin
    The magpie is competing with the nightingale!

    Source: Latin
    The means were wanting, not the will.

    Source: Latin
    The memory of a benefit vanisheth, but the remembrance of an injury sticketh fast in the heart.

    Source: Latin
    The memory of happiness makes misery woeful.

    Source: Latin
    The mice have taken themselves off.

    Source: Latin
    The mill cannot grind with the water that is past.

    Source: Latin
    The miller sees not every wave that flows.

    Source: Latin
    The mind is best taught with a sharp whip.

    Source: Latin
    The mind when unoccupied knows not what it wants.

    Source: Latin
    The misfortune of the foolish is a warning to the wise.

    Source: Latin
    The misfortunes to which we are accustomed affect us less deeply.

    Source: Latin
    The more they have, the more they want.

    Source: Latin
    Latin [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37] [38] [39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [48] [49] [50] [51] [52] [53] [54] [55] [56] [57] [58] [59] [60] [61] [62] [63] [64] [65] [66] [67] [68] [69] [70] [71] [72] [73] [74] [75] [76] [77] [78] [79]